Jim Powers

 

 

Seattle Totems 1958-60, 1962-67, 1968-70
Right Wing - 6'0" - 190 lbs.

Awards/Honors

  • None

Championships

  • WHL Championship:  1959, 1967

 

Statistics

Regular Season Playoffs
GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1958-59 Seattle Totems 56 26 13 39 14
1959-60 Seattle Totems 4 1 0 1 2
1962-63 Seattle Totems 66 36 36 72 23 17 12 8 20 8
1963-64 Seattle Totems 68 27 33 60 16
1964-65 Seattle Totems 68 8 14 22 10 3 1 0 1 0
1965-66 Seattle Totems 72 28 30 58 8
1966-67 Seattle Totems 72 28 16 44 12 9 2 0 2 0
1968-69 Seattle Totems 72 15 10 25 12 3 1 0 1 0
1969-70 Seattle Totems 3 0 0 0 2
Seattle Totals 36 17 8 25 10

"Jumbo" Jim Powers turned professional with the Vancouver Canucks in 1957-58.  He was traded to the Totems the following season on November 24, 1958 in exchange for Alex Kuzma.  Powers was put on a line alongside assist king Guyle Fielder, and the sophomore responded with 26 goals over the remaining 56 games.  Unfortunately a late season leg injury kept him out of the playoffs during the Totems' remarkable 11-1 run to the WHL championship.

Powers was returned to the Canucks for the 1959-60 season, but was quickly re-acquired by the Totems and played the majority of the season with Seattle.  It was back to the Canucks again in 1960-61, and another move the following season that sent him to Los Angeles to play with the Blades.  Keith Allen continued to keep an eye on the forward, who seemed to lose his goal scoring touch after leaving Seattle and the slick passing of Fielder.  Allen thought that Powers could still be productive, and acquired him for the third time for the 1962-63 season, putting him on a line with Fielder and another newcomer to Seattle by the name of Bob Barlow.  The trio became the highest scoring line in the league over the next two seasons, combining for 90 goals per season.

After an off year in 1964-65 during which he scored a paltry eight goals, Powers rebounded with two more solid seasons and was part of the Totems' WHL championship squad in 1966-67.  He was loaned to Providence of the AHL the following season, costing him a third WHL title when Seattle won it again in 1968.  He was recalled to Seattle for the 1968-69 season, and retired as a professional after just a few games in 1969-70.