Bobby Rowe

Seattle Metropolitans 1915-24
Forward - 5'6" - 160 lbs.

Awards/Honors

  • PCHA Penalty Minute Leader:  1923
  • PCHA First Team All-Star:  1918, 1919, 1923
  • PCHA Second Team All-Star:  1917, 1920

Championships

  • PCHA League Championship:  1917, 1919, 1920
  • Stanley Cup Championship:  1917

 

Statistics

Regular Season Playoffs
GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1915-16 Seattle Metropolitans 17 3 5 8 25
1916-17 Seattle Metropolitans 24 9 12 21 45 4 0 2 2 0
1917-18 Seattle Metropolitans 17 3 2 5 28
1918-19 Seattle Metropolitans 20 5 6 11 19 7 1 1 2 6
1919-20 Seattle Metropolitans 22 2 4 6 16 7 2 1 3 13
1920-21 Seattle Metropolitans 24 0 2 2 29 2 0 1 1 0
1921-22 Seattle Metropolitans 23 2 1 3 34 2 0 0 0 6
1922-23 Seattle Metropoiltans 30 7 2 9 71
1923-24 Seattle Metropolitans 24 10 2 12 30 2 0 0 0 8
Seattle Totals 201 41 36 77 297 24 3 5 8 33
NHL Totals 4 1 0 1 0

Bobby Rowe was one of the first players to jump from the NHA to the PCHA, joining Victoria for the league's inaugural season in 1911-12.  After four seasons with Victoria he and Bernie Morris were sent to the new Seattle Metropolitans in exchange from another player who was jumping his NHA contract, Harry Cameron.  Rowe went on to become a fixture in Seattle, playing in all nine of the Mets' seasons and ranking second on the all-time games played list with the team at 201 (Frank Foyston played in 202 games for the Mets).

Despite his small size Rowe was known as a tough customer, willing to drop the gloves and go at it whenever the need arose.  He was also well known for playing through constant shoulder and leg injuries.  During the 1919 Stanley Cup finals Rowe's ankle was injured so badly that he sat out the fourth game of the series under doctors orders, but when the game went into overtime and his banged up teammates began to falter Rowe took to the ice and helped to hold of the Canadiens to preserve the 0-0 tie.

Sold to Boston of the NHL when the Mets folded, Rowe played briefly with the Bruins in 1924-25 before coming back out west and settling in Portland.  He became a fixture of the local hockey scene there, coaching a number of Rose City teams into the 1940s.