Jack Walker

Seattle Metropolitans 1915-24
Seattle Eskimos 1928-31
Forward - 5'8" - 153 lbs.

Hockey Hall of Fame - 1960

Awards/Honors

  • PCHL Assist Leader:  1930, 1931

Championships

  • PCHA League Championship:  1917, 1919, 1920
  • Stanley Cup Championship:  1917

 

Statistics

Regular Season Playoffs
GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1915-16 Seattle Metropolitans 18 13 6 19 6
1916-17 Seattle Metropolitans 24 11 15 26 3 4 1 2 3 0
1917-18 Seattle Metropolitans 1 0 0 0 0
1918-19 Seattle Metropolitans 20 9 6 15 9 7 3 2 5 3
1919-20 Seattle Metropolitans 21 4 8 12 3 7 2 4 6 0
1920-21 Seattle Metropolitans 23 6 4 10 6 2 0 0 0 0
1921-22 Seattle Metropolitans 20 8 4 12 0 2 0 0 0 0
1922-23 Seattle Metropolitans 29 13 10 23 4
1923-24 Seattle Metropolitans 29 18 5 23 0 2 0 1 1 0
1928-29 Seattle Eskimos 34 5 8 13 4 5 0 2 2 2
1929-30 Seattle Eskimos 26 6 11 17 2
1930-31 Seattle Eskimos 34 2 13 15 8 4 0 3 3 0
Seattle Totals 279 95 90 185 45 33 6 14 20 5
NHL Totals 80 5 8 13 18

Jack Walker came out west with five of his Toronto Blueshirts teammates for the 1915-16 PCHA season.  He skated with the Seattle Metropolitans in all nine seasons of the team's existence, though he did miss the majority of the 1917-18 due to military commitments.  Walker was a steady performer and known for his clean play.  He is also often credited with inventing the hook check, a technique he used with great successes.

Walker was a member of all three of Seattle's Stanley Cup teams, winning the Cup with the Mets in 1917 (he had also won the Cup with Toronto in 1914). 

Following the demise of the Mets in 1924, Walker was signed as a free agent by the Victoria Cougars.  He played two seasons in Victoria, winning his third Stanley Cup with the team in 1925 (a club that included four former Mets).  With the end of the Cougar franchise in 1926 Walker's rights were transferred to the Detroit Cougars of the NHL, where he played alongside a number of former teammates including Frank Foyston and Gord Fraser. 

When Walker learned of the construction of the new Civic Arena in Seattle and the founding of a new league there in 1928, he obtained his release from Detroit and joined the Seattle Eskimos, managed by his old coach Pete Muldoon.  Though he was now 40-years-old and arguably past his prime, Jack was an old fan favorite and a good drawing card in the early days of the new team.  While he didn't score a lot of goals, he did lead the league in assists twice and continued to play good, competitive hockey. 

After his stint with the Eskimos, Walker turned briefly to coaching in California before returning to Seattle to work as a linesman and a referee in NWHL and PCHL games.  He continued working as both an on and off-ice official into the 1940s with the Seattle City League.  He was elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1960.